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DILWORTH DEALS

Proudly Serving Dilworth Coffee (PSDC)

Enrolling in the PSDC program is voluntary and at no extra cost but does require a commitment of exclusivity. Learn more at https://www.dilworthcoffee.com/psdc-benefits-of-enrollment/

***For Wholesale Customers***
It is now time for the February PSDC items,
BRAZIL MOGIANA COFFEE
CHOCOLATE RASPBERRY FLAVORED COFFEE
ESPRESSO TONIC
When you order these coffee’s you will automatically get 5%off!
Retail customers you can also cash in on this months deals! Just visit our website to pick up these delicious coffees while on sale!
https://www.dilworthcoffee.com/shop/

Dilworth Coffee Training Events

Our February classes are filling up fast, if you would like to attend, reserve your seat now. For a list of classes and times visit
https://www.dilworthcoffee.com/learn/dilworth-coffee-training-events/ Beanology, Coffee Brewing Basics, and Catalog Cupping have a few seats left, our February Barista Skills – Foundations has sold out.

Post Inventory Clear Out
Next week we will be starting our Post Inventory Clear Out. Stay tuned for the product list next week!

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Barista at Home: Grinding Coffee

grinding coffee

The humble coffee grinder.

It’s the unsung hero of the coffee bar. Standing in the shadows of flashy espresso machines and towering batch brewers, grinding coffee without fanfare. If espresso equipment were a band, the coffee grinder would be the bass player.

Just like solid bass grooves underpin tasty melodies, grinding coffee properly can really help your espresso and brewed coffee sing. But what does it mean to grind coffee well? And how can the Barista at Home choose a grinder that’ll lay down a smooth bass-line for a pitch-perfect cup?

It’s all about flavor.

Properly ground coffee is the right size to brew delicious coffee.

Professional baristas know that controlling grind is an easy way to fine-tune their drip or espresso brewing. Readers of our Barista at Home: Brewing Essentials article will know why: the key to great coffee flavor is grinding coffee to the right size for the brewing method. Understanding that can help the Barista at Home brew delicious coffee in their own kitchen.

That knowledge also helps when choosing a grinder for your home coffee bar. A good grinder makes it easy to grind coffee to the right size. It should be consistent, always grinding coffee the way you expect at a given setting. It will also be easy to adjust, changing in a predictable fashion when necessary.

Grinding coffee particles to the correct size is important for flavor, but this song has a second verse.

Like your favorite ceramic coffee mug, a roasted coffee bean is brittle.

The process of grinding coffee involves shearing and shattering the brittle coffee bean structure into tiny bits. As anyone who’s ever dropped a ceramic coffee mug can attest, shattering usually produces an extremely wide range of pieces.

That wide range of pieces can be trouble for the barista.

Imagine you want to brew some coffee using a pour-over. Your favorite Dilworth Coffee brewing guide recommends a medium-fine grind. With that in mind, you measure out your coffee beans and grind them at the correct setting. Now, take a close look at the result:

Most grinders are happy to produce the medium-fine size grounds you wanted. Along with them, all grinders will also produce something you didn’t want: very large and very small particles that we call “boulders and dust”.

Too many boulders and dust means poor coffee flavor.

Coffee made from just those boulders might rock if given 6-8 minutes of contact time in a French Press. The dust might also be fine if brewed in an espresso machine. But since all of the grounds are instead destined for a 3-minute pour-over, the song may not be so sweet.

A little bit of variation is ok (in fact, the coffee I made with the grounds in the picture above was delicious). But brews made with too many boulders and dust will be an unbalanced mixture of sour (underextracted) and bitter (overextracted) coffee.

What does that mean for the Barista at Home? Whirley-blade grinders may be inexpensive, but they produce far too many boulders and dust for a great cup. For consistently tasty coffee, choose a grinder with high-quality grinding burrs like this one.

Good grinders are built to last.

You use your coffee equipment often; in many cases, before you’ve had your first cup of coffee. For that reason, it’s worth looking for a grinder that’s easily operated by sleepy brains and sturdy enough to survive the occasional bump.

Professional baristas also know that grinder burrs work best when sharp, and replace them occasionally. Burrs should last several years in the average home. When it comes time to replace those burrs (or your grinder has taken an unplanned trip to the kitchen floor) many manufacturers are happy to stand behind their products with parts and service support.

A good grinder is your coffee’s unsung hero.

Coffee grinders may not be the stars of the show, but by consistently grinding coffee properly they can help your brewed coffees hit the right note every time.

To talk about coffee grinders, or sweet bass grooves, call Dilworth Coffee at 866 849 1682 and ask for Brady.

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Barista at Home: Brewing Essentials

brewing essentials

The Holiday Season is upon us. For many of us, that means traveling to visit family and friends. For baristas, chances are good we’ll be waking up early and brewing them coffee once we get there.

What do baristas do differently that makes our coffee taste so good?

Better yet, what can we all do to make better coffee at home too?

Read on, dear friends…

What makes coffee taste so good?

A roasted coffee bean is a treasure chest full of flavorful sugars, aromatics, acids and oils. The goal of brewing is to unlock the best of those flavors and dissolve them into a delicious and drinkable form.

Baristas know that brewing good coffee at home requires good ingredients, the right tools, and an understanding of the brewing essentials.

What are the brewing essentials?

When we brew coffee, we’re putting the process of extraction to work. Water does the heavy lifting. It dissolves flavoring solids, breaking the bigger molecules down, and then helping them diffuse out of the coffee grounds and into our mugs. A good barista fine tunes the flavor of their brew by controlling this extraction.

The coffee bean may be a treasure chest, but not all the flavors inside are treasures. Fortunately, different flavors extract at different rates and less desirable flavors tend to extract more slowly. Our goal is to pull out as many of the tasty flavors as possible before things start to go wrong.

How do we control the extraction to accomplish this?

Seven elements of the brewing process, the brewing essentials, can help us achieve that deliciousness. Today, we’ll consider two important and closely-linked elements: grind setting and brewing time.

The Grind and why it’s so important.

Imagine we’re flavoring solids enjoying a concert at The Grind Auditorium with thousands of our closest friends. As the show finishes, everyone’s nicely dissolved and ready to head to the afterparty. First, though, we need to diffuse our way out of the venue (preferably leaving some of the more obnoxious flavors in the room behind).

Who will make it to the afterparty before the Mug Club reaches capacity?

That depends largely on two factors: our distance to the nearest exit and the time we have to get there. If The Grind has opened an exit in our section, we can exit quickly. If only the more distant main doors are open, though, it will take a while for all of us to make our way outside.

Extraction is similar. The smaller the ground coffee particle, the closer the exits and the faster the extraction occurs. Conversely, the larger the particle, the longer it takes for extraction to happen.

Fortunately, managing grind particle size is easy if you use a high-quality burr grinder.

What about time?

A given particle size has an ideal contact time; the amount of time water is in contact with the ground coffee determines the amount and quality of coffee flavoring solids extracted. Too short for the particle size and you leave flavor behind yielding a sour, underextracted cup. Too long and those unpleasant flavors start to show up, turning our party harsh, bitter, and overextracted.

Understanding these two brewing essentials can help us control the extraction by matching grind setting and brewing time.

While drip brewers do let you control how quickly water is being poured over the coffee grounds, the coffee bed’s resistance determines how quickly that water drains out. This means your total brewing time can’t be directly controlled.

What to do?

An encore at The Grind.

Water drains more quickly through coarser ground coffee and more slowly through finer ground. That means changing grind setting affects the results in two ways: by changing the speed of the extraction process AND influencing the total brew time.

That’s why controlling grind is the easiest and most effective way to fine tune your drip brewing process.

I usually start with the grinder setting recommended by the Dilworth Coffee Brewing Guides, brew a batch, and taste the results. If the coffee tastes bitter and brewing took longer than recommended, I’ll try again with a slightly coarser grind. If it tastes thin and sour and the time was too fast, I’ll use a slightly finer grind.

Let those barista guests sleep in!

With the right combination of grind setting and brewing time, you can manage your extraction like a professional and unlock those tasty flavors for yourself. Just make sure to save them a cup, I hear that show at The Grind went pretty late.

To learn even more about the brewing essentials check out next week’s edition of Barista at Home: Coffee Brewing Gear. Can’t wait that long? Contact Brady Butler at 866-849-1682.